Saturday, July 16, 2005

O'Conner Nailed It

by Joan Bokaer

Justice Sandra Day O’Conner hit the nail on the head in one of the last opinions she wrote during her tenure on the U.S. Supreme Court:

"Those who would renegotiate the boundaries between church and state must therefore answer a difficult question: why would we trade a system that has served us so well for one that has served others so poorly?"


The Supreme Court was ruling on a case regarding the constitutionality of placing the Ten Commandments on public land, June 27, 2005.

Was O'Conner referring to the kind of people Bush has been appointing to the U.S. Appellate Courts who are notorious foes of church-state separation? Justices such as Michael W. McConnell of the Tenth Circuit of Appeals? McConnell is on a very short list for the Supreme Court and would clearly "renegotiate the boundaries between church and state."

When talking about the next Supreme Court appointment, there is much discussion of Roe v. Wade, but something much deeper is at stake. "Twenty-five years ago," explains Pulitzer Prize wining journalist Chris Hedges, "Pat Robertson and other prominent evangelists began speaking of a new political religion that would direct its efforts at taking control of all major American institutions, including mainstream denominations and the government so as to transform the United States into a global Christian empire." (Harper's, May, 2005)

This "new political religion" now reaches far into both houses of Congress and the White House. Their greatest obstacle has been a Supreme Court that supports the principle of separation of church and state.


Joan Bokaer is the founder of Theocracy Watch

3 Comments:

Blogger Bruce Wilson said...

I posted this as a diary on the Daily Kos. Here is a link to that conversation

3:47 PM  
Blogger Tom said...

Is the right proposing "inactivist" judges?... Or just an opportunity to establish "special rights" for the Christian "lifestyle"?

7:34 AM  
Blogger Bruce Wilson said...

Well, the end goal is to tie American jurisprudence to Biblical Law.

1:58 PM  

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